Portrait of Marshall Reeves before the start of Race Across America.

Portrait of Marshall Reeves before the start of Race Across America.

The Race Across America (RAAM) - the "World's Toughest Race" - is a 3,000 miles bicycle race that starts in Oceanside, CA and ends in Annapolis, MD. This year, I was very fortunate to work for 3000 to a Cure and document one of their cyclists, Marshall Reeves, as he tried to complete RAAM while raising money for brain cancer research.

I'll let my images do most of the talking but I think Marshall summed it up perfectly in his post-race interview: "It is pretty selfish if all you're doing is [racing]. It's a lot of pain, a lot of training, a lot of sacrifice, but it's something you volunteer for. Whereas people who are afflicted by a lot of diseases, in particular brain cancer, they didn't pick that battle but they're faced with it and it's just as daunting and devastating as it can be. Far more so than this race. You can stop racing, you can finish the race ... but if you are diagnosed with brain cancer, it's a death sentence. And so I realized I needed to do something worthwhile with this effort or it would just be for naught."

Marshall completed the race in 12 days, 13 hours, and 52 minutes and raised over $16,000 dollars for brain cancer research. You can still donate by visiting the site here

In my images, I wanted to show how grueling this race is and how it does push racers and crews to their limits. I wanted to show everything that goes into this 3000 mile journey.

Marshall Reeves began his 3,000 mile, cross-country journey in Oceanside, CA on June 14th, 2016. This was his third attempt at completing the Race Across America, also known as the World's Toughest Race. The difference was that this year, he was racing to raise money for brain cancer research.

Marshall Reeves began his 3,000 mile, cross-country journey in Oceanside, CA on June 14th, 2016. This was his third attempt at completing the Race Across America, also known as the World's Toughest Race. The difference was that this year, he was racing to raise money for brain cancer research.

There's a lot of climbing in the Race Across America where racers' endurance is tested. Marshall climbed the Yarnell Grade, a 1,800 foot climb over seven miles, almost always pedaling off his sadle. Photo taken by Bryan Cereijo on June 15th, 2016.

There's a lot of climbing in the Race Across America where racers' endurance is tested. Marshall climbed the Yarnell Grade, a 1,800 foot climb over seven miles, almost always pedaling off his sadle. Photo taken by Bryan Cereijo on June 15th, 2016.

One of the more challenging parts of the race is the Wolf Creek Pass climb where cyclists have to climb up to 10,857 feet. The steep grade and lack of oxygen at such a high altitude make it difficult to get through. Marshall stands up to pedal through the pass on June 18th, 2016.

One of the more challenging parts of the race is the Wolf Creek Pass climb where cyclists have to climb up to 10,857 feet. The steep grade and lack of oxygen at such a high altitude make it difficult to get through. Marshall stands up to pedal through the pass on June 18th, 2016.

Cramps plagued Marshall through the first several days of the race as he tried to get throught he desert. The intense heat during the day and the frigid nights did not help the cause. Pictured is crew member Jacob Bouchard quickly massaging Marshall in his RV during a stop on June 15th, 2016.

Cramps plagued Marshall through the first several days of the race as he tried to get throught he desert. The intense heat during the day and the frigid nights did not help the cause. Pictured is crew member Jacob Bouchard quickly massaging Marshall in his RV during a stop on June 15th, 2016.

Crew member Ryan Jean sleeps in one of the follow vehicles as crew members Tyler Jandreau and Joseph Joseph wait for Marshall to arrive for a quick stop on June 21st, 2016. Marshall's crew consisted of only 6 people who had to alternate shifts while Marshall was on the bike for more than 20 hours a day.

Crew member Ryan Jean sleeps in one of the follow vehicles as crew members Tyler Jandreau and Joseph Joseph wait for Marshall to arrive for a quick stop on June 21st, 2016. Marshall's crew consisted of only 6 people who had to alternate shifts while Marshall was on the bike for more than 20 hours a day.

Crew member Tyler Jandreau applies zinc oxide cream to Marshall's head to prevent sunburns during the day ride on June 18th, 2016.

Crew member Tyler Jandreau applies zinc oxide cream to Marshall's head to prevent sunburns during the day ride on June 18th, 2016.

Marshall Reeves passes through Monument Valley in Arizona on June 17th, 2016  as he makes his way to Utah.

Marshall Reeves passes through Monument Valley in Arizona on June 17th, 2016  as he makes his way to Utah.

From left to right, crew members Ryan Jean, Tyler Jandreau, and Jesse Reeves massage Marshall as he eats to get him ready for a full night of riding. Marshall had little time to stop as he was trying to make it to the Mississippi River time cutoff. Photo taken on June 22nd, 2016.

From left to right, crew members Ryan Jean, Tyler Jandreau, and Jesse Reeves massage Marshall as he eats to get him ready for a full night of riding. Marshall had little time to stop as he was trying to make it to the Mississippi River time cutoff. Photo taken on June 22nd, 2016.

Marshall Reeves smiles before heading out for another full night of riding on June 23rd, 2016. By this point, he was 9 days in and had pedaled almost 2,000 miles.

Marshall Reeves smiles before heading out for another full night of riding on June 23rd, 2016. By this point, he was 9 days in and had pedaled almost 2,000 miles.

Marshall Reeves passes the Mississipi River bridge on the night of June 23rd, 2016, making the time cutoff. For many racers just getting to this point is a huge accomplishment because it represents completing two-thirds of the race.

Marshall Reeves passes the Mississipi River bridge on the night of June 23rd, 2016, making the time cutoff. For many racers just getting to this point is a huge accomplishment because it represents completing two-thirds of the race.

Marshall eats KFC wings that his crew had bought for him as crew member Jacob Bouchard massages his back. Marshall was exhausted but had 3 days of 20 hour rides ahead of him before the finish. Photo taken on June 23rd, 2016.

Marshall eats KFC wings that his crew had bought for him as crew member Jacob Bouchard massages his back. Marshall was exhausted but had 3 days of 20 hour rides ahead of him before the finish. Photo taken on June 23rd, 2016.

Marshall Reeves clears a rolling hill in West Virginia on June 25th, 2016. The last stages of the race because cyclists are plagued with muscle aches and fatigue. Marshall finished the race on June 26th, 2016 with a time of 12 days, 13 hours, and 52 minutes.

Marshall Reeves clears a rolling hill in West Virginia on June 25th, 2016. The last stages of the race because cyclists are plagued with muscle aches and fatigue. Marshall finished the race on June 26th, 2016 with a time of 12 days, 13 hours, and 52 minutes.

and there it is... After going through the thousands of frames, countless re-edits, and advice from peers, those were the 12 I selected and put together to show what Race Across America is and what it takes from an individual to complete. However, there are a few other images that did not make the story that I would love to share because I do think they are valuable: